Technical Theater for Nontechnical People  by Drew Campbell (Author)

Two under-appreciated theatrical specialties, technical production for the novice and audience development, take center stage in these two thorough works. With hundreds of production/design/technical credits behind him, Campbell has written what will certainly become a standard introductory text on technical theater.

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 From Library Journal
Two under-appreciated theatrical specialties, technical production for the novice and audience development, take center stage in these two thorough works. With hundreds of production/design/technical credits behind him, Campbell has written what will certainly become a standard introductory text on technical theater. All facets of production are clearly explained in jargon-free prose, and unfamiliar terms are highlighted and defined in an appended glossary. In addition to separate chapters on the more traditional elements of technical theater (lights, sound, scenery, properties), Campbell gives equal weight to the venue, design, stage management, corporate theater, and checklists. As valuable as this comprehensive manual is for the neophyte, experienced techies will also benefit from its common sense. Everyone involved with theater should have acces to this most welcome text. Stage Directions, "the practical magazine of theater," is to the theater community what the U*N*A*B*A*S*H*E*D Librarian is to librarians. This guide to cultivating and retaining an audience, the most perplexing and financially significant problem facing every theater, is the latest entry in Heinemann's "Stage Directions" series, compiled mostly from previously published articles in the magazine. This practical compendium, arranged in three sections, addresses how to attract and retain a constituency and profiles several theaters that have been successful in both areas. A more focused and audience-specific work, this title will be of value to theater administrators and marketers as well as smaller theater groups seeking practical and empirically tested ideas and solutions.ABarry X. Miller, Austin P.L., TX
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

American Association of Community Theater
A resource that is concise, entertaining, and eminently practical.

Stagetechbooks.com
An excellent handbook for the beginner and occasional technician, or indeed for the professional regularly working with the less experienced.

Book Description
This innovative resource has been completely updated to reflect state-of-the-art standards in today's fast-changing theater technology. Designed exclusively for nontechnicians in the field, this pioneering book helps actors, dancers, playwrights, and directors to understand every aspect of a traditional and digitally supported backstage environment, from scenery, lighting, sound to props, and stage management to the use of integrated show control systems. The new edition covers new technology that has become mainstream, such as computer-controlled lightning instruments and audio (including various new formats), software to build audio cues, and PC-based audio play-back systems. A new chapter discusses show control systems that allow theater directors to make informed choices on which software to choose (the book covers DMX, MIDI, and SMPTI) and how to communicate their needs to a programmer. A chapter on costumes has been added to improve the communication between theaters and the costume department or rental company, including a check-list with helpful questions. All facets of production are clearly explained in jargon-free prose, and unfamiliar terms are highlighted and defined in an appended glossary. Besides theater newcomers and professionals, the book has targeted advice for event planners working and show producers working in the convention business, fashion, real estate, sports, and politics, including a special chapter on "How to Do a Show in a Hotel." Written with clarity and humor, this is the definitive user's guide to developing the vocabulary and technical skills crucial to working with technicians and technical equipment in a timely, efficient manner.

From the Publisher
With constantly changing technology, new generations of producers, actors, dancers, playwrights, directors, and others can find themselves in the dark on the technical matters of their art. More than ever, those involved in live performance need an easy tool to help them grasp the technical side. A newly revised and expanded resource is doing just that. Technical Theater for Nontechnical People second edition by Drew Campbell helps readers to understand and utilize every aspect of the backstage environment.

From the Author
"There are a lot of people in the world who have no desire to be technicians," the author observes. "They don't want to master the technology; they want to use it. They want to stand in the right place on stage. They want to communicate with a designer or a technician. They want to walk into a rental company and know what to ask for. They just want to survive backstage."

From the Inside Flap
Updated to reflect today's fast-changing technology, Technical Theater for Nontechnical People is an essential guide for working with technicians and technical equipment. Technical Theater for Nontechnical People will teach readers:

What they need to know about technical theater and why What to look for when choosing a space for your show How to communicate with lighting, scenery, audio, and costume designers How to stage manage an effective show or presentation Terms and jargon that will help you survive backstage

With comprehensive explanations of the equipment and concepts, and important terms highlighted and defined in a convenient glossary, Technical Theater for Nontechnical People is a must-have for those in convention planning, fashion, real estate, sports, politics, and others preparing for public presentations.

From the Back Cover
This unparalleled resource walks readers through every aspect of the backstage environment, from scenery to lighting to sound to props, as well as the often-overlooked area of stage management. The book is filled with helpful illustrations, backstage survival guides, and a glossary of key terms.

Comprehensive and easy to understand, the coverage includes:

* Working with designers to get the right look
* Tricks and tools for set building and enhancing scene-change choreography
* Setting a mood and creating focus with light
* Sculpting sound with microphones, mixers, and other sources
* Understanding floor plans
* Assessing a performance space
* Developing a prop list Managing a show both on and backstage

Drew Campbell's savvy advice and enthusiastic approach will help even the biggest technophobe to plan and mount productions and enjoy doing it. The book gives tips and techniques for producing everything from fashion and dance shows to musicals, parties, conventions, press conferences, and new product roll-outs. Technical Theater for Nontechnical People is the definitive guide to developing the vocabulary and technical skills crucial to working successfully on any staged event. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author
Drew Campbell has been in the entertainment business as a stage technician, designer, film lighting technician, director, and teacher for more than twenty years. He has run his own business as an industrial videographer and editor, has worked backstage on hundreds of productions, including drama, opera, dance, fashion shows, conventions, horse shows, and athletic events, and has taught at San Francisco State University for seven years. The author of Technical Film and Television for Nontechnical People, he currently manages lighting, sound, and video for the Universal Studios Hollywood theme park.