Heating, Cooling, Lighting: Design Methods for Architects  by Norbert Lechner (Author)

Qualitative graphic approach to understanding the techniques of heating, cooling, and lighting reflects the decision-making approach of architects and students.

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Review
"The Second Edition of Heating, Cooling, Lighting is one of the most useful and important books on building design in years...Nowhere else have we seen such clear explanations of enery flow mechanisms that occur in buildings. Take our word for it, this book is a must have for any design firm." --Environmental Building News, May 2001

Book Description
* Qualitative graphic approach to understanding the techniques of heating, cooling, and lighting reflects the decision-making approach of architects and students.
* Useful appendices provide sun path diagrams and solar site evaluation tools. Appendices new to this edition include practical checklists of strategies and issues in evaluating energy use in the building design stage, and an annotated list of helpful sustainability videos to use in class, professional meetings, or with clients.
* A new chapter on photovoltaics discusses their use as an ideal energy source, offers design options, and case studies as well as their future role in building design.
* A new chapter on sustainable "green" design includes case studies and examples of water conservation measures, effects from energy production and consumption, and an analysis of indoor air quality.
* Mathematical formulas are excerpted from the text and appear in side boxes, so they don't cloud the text with overly-technical information.

The publisher, John Wiley & Sons
Using a qualitative rather than a quantitative approach, presents detailed information based on concepts, rules, guidelines, intuition, and experience for architects in the areas of heating, cooling, and lighting at the schematic design stage. The data explored supports a three-tiered approach--load avoidance, using natural energy sources, and mechanical equipment. Among the topics covered are shading, thermal envelope, passive heating and cooling, electric lighting, and HVAC. Case studies illustrate how certain buildings use techniques at all three tiers for heating, cooling, and lighting. An appendix lists some of the more appropriate computer programs available to the architect for analysis at the schematic design stage.